Maknae

Eu compartilhei muitos momentos com você Esses momentos felizes que eu não percebi antes A estrada em que eu caminhei até agora A estrada em que eu caminhei sozinho enquanto chorava Você a mudou completamente Agora eu percebi O motivo dessa estrada ser linda. ~The Reason - SHINee~
~creditos~

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Cha Hakyeon's 24시간 우~우~우~

(Source: cha-nnnnn, via jeonggucci)


Vídeo postado em 22/12/2013 às 3:43pm | 1,423 notes | (reblogue this!)


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when a fan whispered a compliment to Key

(Source: inscentra, via shiningscenarios)


Vídeo postado em 14/12/2013 às 6:32pm | 98,472 notes | (reblogue this!)


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charmanderisaslut:

If you think that dating your bias would be great, think again. You’d hardly ever get to be with him, you’d have to deal with him being harassed by literally thousands of girls, you’d only get sex like once a month. It’s not worth it. Unless your bias is Onew, in which case getting the D would incapacitate you for exactly a month.

(Source: a-lonely-charmander, via kagayakimasu)

Texto postado em 14/12/2013 às 5:55pm | 1,542 notes | (reblogue this!)

rubmesomevixx:

Read More

Texto postado em 14/12/2013 às 5:54pm | 73 notes | (reblogue this!)

Can we all just appreciate Jonghyun for bravely standing up for gay rights in a homophobic society even though he’s getting stick for “being gay” and not just for being a true sweetheart?

(Source: shiningscenarios)

Texto postado em 14/12/2013 às 5:12pm | 144 notes | (reblogue this!)

Can we all just appreciate Jonghyun for bravely standing up for gay rights in a homophobic society even though he’s getting stick for “being gay” and not just for being a true sweetheart?

(Source: shiningscenarios)

Texto postado em 14/12/2013 às 5:12pm | 144 notes | (reblogue this!)
jonqfi:


Hyunstar about Jonghyun’s new profile picture content: “Jonghyun’s new profile picture is a message stuck on the notice board of a certain university’s sociology department. The title of the essay is: “Not welcomed no matter what we are called”. The essence of the content is to encourage people to stop discriminating against LGTBs. Bby is always promoting and spreading positive messages. Jjangjjang man ㅎㅅㅎb 
via: @bling_saur| Chi source: hyunstar| Trans: Yeowoo

Full translation

< No matter what name you call us, we are not ‘Annyeong’ (well) > Last April, the third attempt to enact anti-discrimination legislation was turned down because of those who loathe equality. In September, Kim Jo-kwang-soo and Kim Seung-hwan publically held a same sex wedding for the first time in Korea. There were disturbances such as human excrements being thrown onto the stage, but Kim Jo-kwang-soo and Kim Seung-hwan marched down the aisle with pride as to prove that “love is stronger than hate.” But a few days ago, their marriage registration was denied. Also, some people voiced ridiculous claims that textbooks should discuss the issue of the humans rights of sexual minorities as a topic you agree or disagree with. Many of you who read this will think like this: how on earth does this concern me or the state of current affairs? But because I know him [Kim Jo-kwang-su], I can tell you this. Whether you are pleased with this or not, this is the story of the world that sexual minorities, including myself, live through, who dine, take classes, study, and have debates with with all of you. This is another side of the current affairs of the society we live in.  Yes, I am a sexual minority. I am a male to female transgender person and I am bisexual. I am a woman. I am of the “880,000 Won” generation. I am a college student. I am one of the inheritors of the working class. What more names can you call me by? There will be no end if you tried to enumerate them one by one. It’s not just me, but probably all of you are living in the present, being called by numerous names.  But I am not okay, not at peace at any moment, whichever name I am being called. Today’s Korean society not only can’t enact an anti-discrimination law, but discriminates against sexual minorities on a daily basis, throws rampant unfair criticism and hatred towards females, exploits the young generation, forces college students to be absorbed with employment instead of academics. Which name should I be called in order to be at ease? Someone asked us this. Are you guys Annyeong, whether we are doing well. That’s what I’m saying. Are we all well when we’re relieved that anothers’ pain is “not mine,” growing accustomed to closing our eyes and blocking our ears in order to protect our own lives? How well can we be in a cold-hearted world when it continuously presses us to give up empathy? I’m not saying that we all should pour out on the streets and start throwing stones. It’s just that, if this story of asking whether all of us living today are Annyeong (doing well) provides an opportunity to look into the face of the person next to you and call their name, I think this has been worthwhile. As the world becomes lonelier, I think, contrary to our belief, the way for us to become ‘well’ is nearby. Right now, please ask the person next to you, “Are you well?” From snowy Sungkonghoe University, Kim Eun-ha, Department of Social Sciences T/N: Annyeong: the literal definition of the greeting is ‘a state of tranquility’ T/N: 880,000 Won Generation refers to the demographic of Korea in their 20’s that suffered employment instability around 2007. Multiplying the average paycheck of part time workers, 1,190,000 won (1130 USD), by the average salary rate for people in their 20s, 73%, results in 880,000 Won. This is the first amongst many generations in Korea to play the “Game of the Winner Takes All.” This term was first used in the book 880,000 Won Generation, published in August, 2007. The author, Woo Suk-hoon says “Only the top 5% of people in their 20s will have a stable job above middle management and the others will live on part time employment with an average wage of 880,000 Won.” [naver encyclopedia/ MK Business News, news.mk.co.kr ]
Translation credits: @dustypixie718

jonqfi:

Hyunstar about Jonghyun’s new profile picture content: “Jonghyun’s new profile picture is a message stuck on the notice board of a certain university’s sociology department. The title of the essay is: “Not welcomed no matter what we are called”. The essence of the content is to encourage people to stop discriminating against LGTBs. Bby is always promoting and spreading positive messages. Jjangjjang man ㅎㅅㅎb 

via: @bling_saur| Chi source: hyunstar| Trans: Yeowoo

Full translation

< No matter what name you call us, we are not ‘Annyeong’ (well) >

Last April, the third attempt to enact anti-discrimination legislation was turned down because of those who loathe equality. In September, Kim Jo-kwang-soo and Kim Seung-hwan publically held a same sex wedding for the first time in Korea. There were disturbances such as human excrements being thrown onto the stage, but Kim Jo-kwang-soo and Kim Seung-hwan marched down the aisle with pride as to prove that “love is stronger than hate.” But a few days ago, their marriage registration was denied. Also, some people voiced ridiculous claims that textbooks should discuss the issue of the humans rights of sexual minorities as a topic you agree or disagree with.

Many of you who read this will think like this: how on earth does this concern me or the state of current affairs? But because I know him [Kim Jo-kwang-su], I can tell you this. Whether you are pleased with this or not, this is the story of the world that sexual minorities, including myself, live through, who dine, take classes, study, and have debates with with all of you. This is another side of the current affairs of the society we live in.

Yes, I am a sexual minority. I am a male to female transgender person and I am bisexual. I am a woman. I am of the “880,000 Won” generation. I am a college student. I am one of the inheritors of the working class. What more names can you call me by? There will be no end if you tried to enumerate them one by one. It’s not just me, but probably all of you are living in the present, being called by numerous names.

But I am not okay, not at peace at any moment, whichever name I am being called. Today’s Korean society not only can’t enact an anti-discrimination law, but discriminates against sexual minorities on a daily basis, throws rampant unfair criticism and hatred towards females, exploits the young generation, forces college students to be absorbed with employment instead of academics. Which name should I be called in order to be at ease?

Someone asked us this. Are you guys Annyeong, whether we are doing well. That’s what I’m saying. Are we all well when we’re relieved that anothers’ pain is “not mine,” growing accustomed to closing our eyes and blocking our ears in order to protect our own lives? How well can we be in a cold-hearted world when it continuously presses us to give up empathy?

I’m not saying that we all should pour out on the streets and start throwing stones. It’s just that, if this story of asking whether all of us living today are Annyeong (doing well) provides an opportunity to look into the face of the person next to you and call their name, I think this has been worthwhile. As the world becomes lonelier, I think, contrary to our belief, the way for us to become ‘well’ is nearby. Right now, please ask the person next to you, “Are you well?”


From snowy Sungkonghoe University,

Kim Eun-ha, Department of Social Sciences

T/N: Annyeong: the literal definition of the greeting is ‘a state of tranquility’
T/N: 880,000 Won Generation refers to the demographic of Korea in their 20’s that suffered employment instability around 2007. Multiplying the average paycheck of part time workers, 1,190,000 won (1130 USD), by the average salary rate for people in their 20s, 73%, results in 880,000 Won. This is the first amongst many generations in Korea to play the “Game of the Winner Takes All.” This term was first used in the book 880,000 Won Generation, published in August, 2007. The author, Woo Suk-hoon says “Only the top 5% of people in their 20s will have a stable job above middle management and the others will live on part time employment with an average wage of 880,000 Won.” [naver encyclopedia/ MK Business News, news.mk.co.kr ]

Translation credits: @dustypixie718

(Source: littleshinee, via amigonew)


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